What Did You Do On 9/11?

by

Tomorrow Americans will remember how our country was profoundly changed with the terrorist attacks that happened now nine years ago. Unimaginable horror awaited those who rushed to the scenes of the attacks. Thousands of police officers, firefighters and emergency medical workers offered whatever assistance that they could. They worked tirelessly, not only on 9/11, but for weeks and months to come.

While reflecting on the events of 9/11 I came across this heroic story of a fellow nurse who displayed tremendous courage and that we can all appreciate.  Who knew that walking through feet of soot and dust, passing burning cars and climbing over boulders would soon prove to be the least of RN Megan Weiss’s worries on 9/11 and the days that followed.

Within minutes of the first attacks, Weiss left NYU Medical Center and was on her way to help those in need at the base of the Twin Towers. There Weiss and only two nurses worked alongside the firefighters and policemen gathering supplies and helping the wounded.  Weiss ran up 18 flights of stairs every 15 to 20 minutes to gather any supplies she could find.

Equipped with very little supplies (only two IV’s when 20 firefighters needed them) Weiss and other emergency personnel continued to intensify their efforts while overcoming their own essential needs of food, water and sleep.  Weiss said “I don’t think anyone could imagine it. There were body parts everywhere. It looked like a movie when things explode. I was walking in two feet of urine and feces because the septic tanks had blown. Firefighters were vomiting because of the heat and smell.”

Although, this is only one of the instances where fellow medical and emergency professionals truly showed what it is to be a proud American; our country could not have made it through that day if it were not for the hard work and dedication of those who sacrificed their time and lives to help. I want to personally thank all of you from the bottom of my heart.

Where were you?

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3 Responses to “What Did You Do On 9/11?”

  1. writetools Says:

    Thank you for sharing this story. I am glad others are talking about their experiences, it helps. I just wrote on blog on where I was…in the middle of the outback in Austrailia watching it unfold on FOX with about 300 Marines in an underground bunker. I WILL never forget. I couldn’t hold back tears writing it, even nine years later. You are right, we should never forget. Thanks for your post. Amie
    http://www.writetools.wordpress.com

  2. Steve Says:

    Hi Amie,

    Thank you for the comment you left and for writing your blog also.

    I cannot believe it is nine years already, it seems like it was just yesterday!

    It was great to hear in your blog how complete strangers held hands, prayed, and just talked to each other. I cannot imagine what that flight must have been like….I can imagine everyone was on edge the whole time. It was great to see how not only we as a country became close, but also as you said how the world stood behind us.

    Thank you for your comment again and also please thank your husband for his time served in the Marines. Our country would not be what it is without people like him. Thank you for sharing your story.

    -Steve

  3. Medical Heros on 9/11 and today « Clear Matters Says:

    […] As hard as our work can be in healthcare, we still find a way to do even more when duty calls. Nine years ago we saw it, and in the ER’s around the country I see it every day. Tomorrow Americans will remember how our country was profoundly changed with the terrorist attacks that happened now nine years ago. Unimaginable horror awaited those who rushed to the scenes of the attacks. Thousands of police officers, firefighters and emergency medical workers offered whatever assistance that they could. They worked tirelessly, not only on 9/11, but for weeks and months to come. While reflecting on the events of 9/11 I came ac … Read More […]

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